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Glossary

Aluminum

Aluminum is an excellent conductor of heat making it one of the more popular materials used in the construction of cookware. Because of this quality, heat spreads quickly and evenly across the bottom, up the sides and across the cover to completely surround the food being cooked.

Aluminum is lightweight metal and easy to handle. The gauge or thickness of aluminum cookware is one feature that determines its quality: the heavier the gauge (thickness), the more durable and generally the more costly the cookware. Aluminum is used in the creations of many different types of cookware on the market today, ranging from cast, to forged, pressed and hard anodized. The main reason for this popular choice in material is aluminum has superb heat conductivity and it is less expensive compared to other materials such as copper or stainless steel.

Aluminum is remarkable for the metal's low density and for its ability to resist corrosion. It is a relatively soft, durable, lightweight, ductile and malleable metal with appearance ranging from silvery to dull gray, depending on the surface roughness. Corrosion resistance can be excellent due to a thin surface layer of aluminum oxide that forms when the metal is exposed to air, effectively preventing further oxidation.